Patriarchy & Your Vagina

Last month I created a short video sharing my thoughts on the Supreme Court reversal of the Roe Vs. Wade law. All of a sudden, I saw the correlation between the Yoni and the power that feeds the patriarchy.

Today I want to explain the correlations. I was trying to be brief so the details were left out.

I have read several books that talked about the fall of female led spiritual communities, but did not make the connection until I recalled the sacred connections available through my vagina.

While reading When God Was a Woman by Merlin Stone, I couldn’t completely relate the magnitude of what happened because I was still wedded to Christian thought. I didn’t see myself practicing some “pagan religion”. Such was my indoctrination into the colonial system in which I was acculturated.

The reality is, the Bible is a recount of the desecration of female led religions. Why is this important? According to Mama Zogbe in her book Mama Wata: Volumn 1, Aryans and priests of Amon wanted a share of the lucrative trade routes established under the matriarchal temples in Egypt, Ethiopia and Libya. After the invasion of Amon, more invasions came by the Assyrians, then the Greeks, later the Persians, Turks and Romans. The invasion included raping the priestesses.

When women are defiled, it impacts not only women, but the community. That’s why this tactic was used and continues to be used in modern warfare.

What would later become the patriarchy, learned that certain priestess, used intimate sacred practices for multiple reasons, not just birth. Marguite Mary Rigoglioso, PH.D wrote the Mystery Tradition of Miraculous Conception she posits that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was a priestess from a long line of priestesses who practiced virgin births. Eventually, priests infused themselves into these sacred practices taking control of not only the trade routes, but women’s ability to choose to give birth or not. It became men who lead the priestesses and the men wanted to control the businesses and the transfer of property. In ancient times, property was passed from mother to child. Men of this time wanted to change that.

Later women were devoid of knowledge of powerful priestesses they once were and became servants to the colonial patriarchal system. Women were told that the miraculous event of giving birth was meant as a painful punishment. Or that only functions of a vagina is to have children or to have sex. Even if you don’t have sex with men, what we have come to believe that what we can experience through our vaginas has been limited to purposes that serve the patriarchy. Either way, we have been taught to see our vagina for a very narrowly focused purpose, centered on the desires of the patriarchy.

Now the country is in the process of a spiritual awakening and women and others who have been oppressed under this system are waking up to our true divine nature. This is one of the key reasons a woman’s right to chose has been called into question.

Whether you are Pro-Life or Pro-Choice, your right to control your body has been limited by this Supreme Court decision.

On another note, as a woman who has had an abortion, it is not a decision that is I entered into lightly.

Deciding to end a pregnancy is challenging for any woman. I know whereof I speak.

There is a poem by Gwendolyn Brooks called, that describes this life changing act.


the mother BY GWENDOLYN BROOKS Abortions will not let you forget. You remember the children you got that you did not get, The damp small pulps with a little or with no hair, The singers and workers that never handled the air. You will never neglect or beat Them, or silence or buy with a sweet. You will never wind up the sucking-thumb Or scuttle off ghosts that come. You will never leave them, controlling your luscious sigh, Return for a snack of them, with gobbling mother-eye. I have heard in the voices of the wind the voices of my dim killed children. I have contracted. I have eased My dim dears at the breasts they could never suck. I have said, Sweets, if I sinned, if I seized Your luck And your lives from your unfinished reach, If I stole your births and your names, Your straight baby tears and your games, Your stilted or lovely loves, your tumults, your marriages, aches, and your deaths, If I poisoned the beginnings of your breaths, Believe that even in my deliberateness I was not deliberate. Though why should I whine, Whine that the crime was other than mine?— Since anyhow you are dead. Or rather, or instead, You were never made. But that too, I am afraid, Is faulty: oh, what shall I say, how is the truth to be said? You were born, you had body, you died. It is just that you never giggled or planned or cried. Believe me, I loved you all. Believe me, I knew you, though faintly, and I loved, I loved you All.

Gwendolyn Brooks, “the mother” from Selected Poems. Copyright © 1963 by Gwendolyn Brooks. Reprinted with the permission of the Estate of Gwendolyn Brooks. Source: Selected Poems (Harper & Row, 1963)


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